Jewish Music & Poetry Project

Poets & Musicians

Mascha Kaleko, poet

 

A member of the so-called "lost-generation," Mascha Kaleko (1907-1975) née Golda Markel) was born in the Galicia region in Poland. Part of the Jewish diaspora whose futures were destroyed by the Holocaust--despite their being fortunate enough to escape with their lives--and her family moved to Germany when she was a child. She grew up to become a member of the pre-war Berlin artistic intelligentsia; her first publications of satiric verses were banned by the Nazis in the mid-1930s, and she left Germany for the U.S. shortly before World War II.  She remained in exile for the rest of her life, first in the U.S. and then in Israel, and she refused the Fontane Prize in Literature in the post-war period because one of the members of the panel had been a Nazi. Her story—as an eternal emigrant and exile, a Jew, a woman, and a mother—and her poetry both still resonate today.

mother—and her poetry both still resonate today.
story—as an eternal emigrant and exile, a Jew, a woman, and a
Israel, and she refused the Fontane Prize in Literature in the post-war
period because one of the members of the panel had been a Nazi. Her
story—as an eternal emigrant and exile, a Jew, a woman, and a
mother—and her poetry both still resonate today.
become a member of the pre-war Berlin artistic intelligentsia; her first
publications of satiric verses were banned by the Nazis in the mid-
1930s, and she left Germany for the U.S. shortly before World War II.
1975, née Golda Markel) was born in Poland. Part of the Jewish
diaspora whose futures were destroyed during the Holocaust—despite
their being fortunate enough to escape with their lives, Kaleko and her
family moved to Germany when she was a young child. She grew up to
become a member of the pre-war Berlin artistic intelligentsia; her first
publications of satiric verses were banned by the Nazis in the mid-
1930s, and she left Germany for the U.S. shortly before World War II.
She remained in exile for the rest of her life, first in the U.S. and then in
Israel, and she refused the Fontane Prize in Literature in the post-war
period because one of the members of the panel had been a Nazi. Her
story—as an eternal emigrant and exile, a Jew, a woman, and a
mother—and her poetry both still resonate tod 

 

 

1975, née Golda Markel) was born in Poland. Part of the Jewish
diaspora whose futures were destroyed during the Holocaust—despite
their being fortunate enough to escape with their lives, Kaleko and her
family moved to Germany when she was a young child. She grew up to
become a member of the pre-war Berlin artistic intelligentsia; her first
publications of satiric verses were banned by the Nazis in the mid-
1930s, and she left Germany for the U.S. shortly before World War II.
She remained in exile for the rest of her life, first in the U.S. and then in
Israel, and she refused the Fontane Prize in Literature in the post-war
period because one of the members of the panel had been a Nazi. Her
story—as an eternal emigrant and exile, a Jew, a woman, and a
mother—and her poetry both still resonate today.